Cecil & Harford County Estate Administration Attorney &

Estate Litigation Attorney

Our Top Rated Estate Administration & Probate Law Practice

Focuses on Protecting What's Important!

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The administration of an estate can become very complex without the help of a competent Maryland Estate Administration Attorney. The time after the loss of a loved one can be very emotional and difficult. Our practice understands this difficulty and is focused on completing this process as gently and smoothly as possible.

 

The rules that govern probate can be complicated and often make the process seem more complex than it is.

Probate administration includes:

  • Identifying the estate's assets

  • Paying any debts or taxes owed by the estate

  • Pursuing any claims for payments owed to the estate

  • Determining whether there is a valid will

  • Distributing remaining assets

The Law Office of Chelsea M. Sadler LLC. has vast experience handling cases about Last Will and Testaments, Trusts, Trust Administration, Probate, Preparation & Execution of Business Succession Plans. We excel in personally guiding you through these complex legal processes, explaining each step. Whether you need legal advice or action, We are here to represent you and your unique needs. 

Some Estate Administration Areas we handle are:

  • Advising the personal representative of his or her duties
  • Filing initial documents and making required notifications to beneficiaries and creditors
  • Assisting in performing a thorough inventory of assets and debts of the estate
  • Helping overcome any obstacles regarding the location of, or title to, assets
  • Filing tax returns
  • Distribution of estate assets
  • Filing final documents with the court
  • Estate Disputes

Maryland law requires that the custodian of a document appearing to be the Last Will and Testament (including any Codicil) of the decedent shall file it promptly with the Register of Wills in the county where the decedent was domiciled at the time of death, even if it is not to be offered for probate. Assets held in the decedent’s name alone (including interests held as a tenant in common) must be reported to the Register of Wills. A Personal Representative must be appointed by the Register or the Orphans’ Court before disposing of any assets. When appointed, Letters of Administration will be issued to the Personal Representative

How will your estate be distributed if you die without a will?

 

IF THE DECEDENT IS SURVIVED BY:

  • Spouse and minor children of decedent — spouse receives one-half, children share remaining one-half
  • Spouse and children (all adult) of the decedent—spouse receives $40,000 ($15,000 for a date of death prior to October 1, 2017) plus one-half of remaining estate; children divide balance (the interest of a predeceased child passes to issue of that child)
  • Children only of the decedent — children divide entire estate (the interest of a predeceased child passes to issue of that child)
  • Spouse and parents of the decedent — if married more than 5 years see No. 5, if married less than 5 years the spouse receives $40,000 ($15,000 for a date of death prior to October 1, 2017) plus one-half of remaining estate — both parents divide balance or surviving parent takes balance
  • Spouse of the decedent without other heirs listed above — spouse receives entire estate
  • Parents of the decedent without other heirs listed above — both parents divide entire estate or surviving parent takes all
  • Brothers/sisters of the decedent without heirs listed above — brothers and sisters divide estate equally (share of deceased sibling goes to their issue - nieces and nephews of the decedent)
  • Grandparents without other heirs listed above — grandparents divide entire estate or, if deceased, to their issue (see applicable law for details)
  • Great-grandparents without other heirs listed above — great-grandparents divide entire estate or, if deceased, to their issue
  • Stepchildren — if there are no heirs listed above
  • No living heirs or stepchildren — if decedent was recipient of long-term care benefits under the Maryland Medical Assistance Program at time of death, net estate is paid to Department of Health. Otherwise, the net estate is paid to the Board of Education in the county of the decedent’s domicile

NOTE: “Child” does not include a stepchild or foster child

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Over 10 Years of  Legal Experience

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The Law Office of Chelsea M. Sadler, LLC., has vast experience handling cases about Last Will and Testament, Trusts, Preparation, and Business Succession Plans. We excel in personally guiding you through these complex legal processes, explaining each step. Whether you need legal advice or action, We are here to represent you and your unique needs. Schedule a consultation today to see how we can Protect What's Important!